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Modeling in General
General discussions about modeling topics.
Filling in the gaps???
Armor135
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Ohio, United States
Member Since: March 02, 2002
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Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2002 - 03:50 AM UTC
Does any one know what i can use to fill in gaps in models? I know theres the Testors Contour Puddy but does that stuf work good or resin and plastic or is there anything better I can use??

Thanks guys,
Mike
m1garand
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Washington, United States
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Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2002 - 03:54 AM UTC
There's Squadron white and green putty. There's Zap-a-Gap. I use both and they work very well for me.
Kencelot
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Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2002 - 04:06 AM UTC
Hey Armor135, I use Model Master's Red Putty and Squadrons White Putty.
I've even heard of some here that use Liquid Paper - the stuff for fixing typos. :-)
CaptainJack
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Luxembourg, Belgium
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Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2002 - 06:10 AM UTC
Hmmmmmm Let me see now what Jack Potter has up his sleeve.

1. Vallejo Plastic putty, this stuff is better than peanut butter. Wipe it over small holes or fissures, let dry 5 mins and then you can sand. It has the consistancy of toothpaste, and is easy to use and apply.

2. Typex, Yeah I know, but it works! Especially good for micro bubbling doe to air in the resin.

3. Plumbers putty, also sold under the trade name DURO. Be sure to cut away the center (1mm) where the blue/yellow meet, (X rated!) as thay are having chemical intercourse.

4. Mix even parts of, premixed, Miliput and Duro together for a more elastic, and flexible putty. Yhis is good for flags, clothing and such.

Be careful with Squadron green stuff. It contains Toulene, mean stuff theat doesn't get along at all with babies in the belly!

Jack be cautious
ladymodelbuilder
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Virginia, United States
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Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2002 - 07:05 AM UTC
I do use the liquid paper and it works pretty good. I also use the clear Testors glue for hard to get places. It seems to fill the seams ok. For the big gaps and everything else, I use Squadrons White Putty. I guess it really all depends on what works best for you and what you are working on at the time
Michel
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France
Member Since: March 13, 2002
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Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2002 - 07:38 AM UTC
And there is the old Plastic Goo Trick: pieces of plastic sprues in meltin' liquid ( trichlor Úthylene, MEK...Or other dangerous and smellin' stuff ! )....Not a good way if you ' re in a hurry ( you ' ve to wait a LOT of curing time ! ), but the best way I know if you don' t like to see, usually when you start sandin' down, the " ¨@#%$& " putty popin' up !
' ve a nice day...!
GunTruck
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California, United States
Member Since: December 01, 2001
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Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2002 - 07:39 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hey Armor135, I use Model Master's Red Putty and Squadrons White Putty.
I've even heard of some here that use Liquid Paper - the stuff for fixing typos. :-)



I just gave that White-Out, Liquid Paper, stuff a try based on the recommendations here - and I like it!

Gunnie
TreadHead
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Colorado, United States
Member Since: January 12, 2002
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Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2002 - 07:54 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Hey Armor135, I use Model Master's Red Putty and Squadrons White Putty.
I've even heard of some here that use Liquid Paper - the stuff for fixing typos. :-)



I just gave that White-Out, Liquid Paper, stuff a try based on the recommendations here - and I like it!

Gunnie



Cool Gunnie, do you have to apply multiple coats of the white out or no? Also, don't you have to use a specific white out? I believe the thread I read thru recommended one instead of the other...

Tread.
GunTruck
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Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2002 - 08:02 AM UTC
I'm too new at using it Tread to recommend a specific use for White-Out. I used it filling the trenches around the NATO lights on the rear panel in the Italeri 5-ton cargo box that we were working on last weekend. The engraving is pretty deep, and the NATO lights have got to go. I wound up applying three thin coats of the White-Out, sanding between coats to build up the plug. It worked great - and was quick and easy to do.

Gunnie
drewgimpy
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Utah, United States
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Posted: Sunday, May 12, 2002 - 12:48 PM UTC
I would like to add tamiya putty to the list. I like it a little better than the others listed myself. It looks like I will be heading to the office supply store on monday to get some whiteout though, if that stuff dries as fast on models as it does on paper I will be very happy.
GunTruck
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Posted: Sunday, May 12, 2002 - 10:50 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Cool Gunnie, do you have to apply multiple coats of the white out or no? Also, don't you have to use a specific white out? I believe the thread I read thru recommended one instead of the other...

Tread.



Well, if so I missed it, because I just used what I grabbed! It is plain-old Correction Fluid, Sanford Brand from Boise Cascade...

Gunnie
YodaMan
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Posted: Sunday, May 12, 2002 - 11:02 PM UTC
The correction fluid works best on small cracks, I think. It's a lot easier to use White-Out to fill in the hairline cracks that keep appearing on my Alien model .

YodaMan
Go Red Wings!!!
Phantom
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Missouri, United States
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Posted: Monday, May 13, 2002 - 12:18 AM UTC
I'll add another vote of approval for White-out in certain situations. I was a little too aggressive in cleaning flash out of a wheel well on a '67 Mustang (don't worry, I'm just a casual car modeler), and left a small depression. I used about three coats of white-out to fill in the depression, carefully sanded it with a round file, and now my wheel well has the proper radius again! Yeah!

It's nice for those situations where you just need to fill a small gap, or eliminate surface scratches. Quick, cheap and easy.
Viking
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Wien, Austria
Member Since: January 15, 2002
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Posted: Tuesday, May 14, 2002 - 06:18 PM UTC
hello!
I use cyanoacrylate instant glue and sprinkle food soda onto it. it turns rock hard immediately! but this only works for small gaps.
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