_GOTOBOTTOM
Modeling in General
General discussions about modeling topics.
Sanding and painting
Nailz
Visit this Community
Washington, United States
Member Since: April 05, 2002
entire network: 57 Posts
KitMaker Network: 0 Posts
Posted: Tuesday, May 07, 2002 - 07:10 AM UTC
So I am working on my first model (A-7D Corsair) where I am trying to make it as smooth as possible.... I put the fuselage together, fill in the seams and get it sanded down to where it appears to be very smooth (using the squadron sanding sticks, starting coarse, moving to fine). I lay one the first couple of layers of paint with my airbrush and I am seeing some obvious sanding marks around the seams. My question is, will these go away once I get enough layers of paint on it (I have put on 2 or 3 layers so far), or have I screwed something up and do I need to find another way to fix this?

Thanks!
YodaMan
Visit this Community
United States
Member Since: February 21, 2002
entire network: 1,561 Posts
KitMaker Network: 485 Posts
Posted: Tuesday, May 07, 2002 - 10:59 AM UTC
Howdy there Nailz, welcome to the site!
Hmmm. I don't know if paint from an airbrush will cover sanding marks. I think the paint gets sprayed on too thin. Do you know what the grit was on the fine sanding stick? One thing that works great for me is 1) glue the two parts together, using putty if needed. Sand using about 300 grit sandpaper. 2) I use 400 grit wet/dry paper next. I then take a piece of the sandpaper and dip it in water and sand over the specified area. For some reason wetsanding produces a muchs smoother finish than dry sanding. I don't know why it works, but I'm glad it does! :-) Hope this helps. I've you've got another question, ask away!

YodaMan
Nailz
Visit this Community
Washington, United States
Member Since: April 05, 2002
entire network: 57 Posts
KitMaker Network: 0 Posts
Posted: Tuesday, May 07, 2002 - 11:46 AM UTC
Thanks YodaMan, not sure of the grit on the sanding stick, I just know it is a squadron fine stick, I think I have some more fine sandpaper, maybe I will wet it down and see if that does the trick.....
Tin_Can
Visit this Community
Florida, United States
Member Since: January 26, 2002
entire network: 1,560 Posts
KitMaker Network: 344 Posts
Posted: Tuesday, May 07, 2002 - 07:19 PM UTC
I also wet sand my joints. Be sure you have 'wet & dry' sandpaper and a fine grit. After sanding I go through a four step process with a nail polisher I picked up at Walmart. The polisher has four grades of 'grit' on it: STEP 1-Even Out, STEP 2-Smooth, STEP 3-Buff, STEP 4-Shine. The stick is labeled exactly like that..step 1, 2, 3, 4 to make it easy to ensure your following the right steps in order. On the same stick, there are two sides that have a very, very rough grit. I took my x-acto knife and cut those off (the entire stick is made of foam) because they'll scratch up the surface while using the smoothing surfaces. You can pick it up in the cosmetic area of Walmart in the nails area for like $2.50.

Make sure that when sanding your seams that you sand the smallest area as possible. This means you'll limit the area where the sanding affects the plastic. At the same time, when filling with putty, limit the area where the putty gets put by lining the seam with masking tape to cover up excess plastic. After the putty starts to harden, pull the tape off carefully and you'll have a small line of putty right down the seam you want to work on w/o a lot of excess putty on good plastic. Then, after the putty has hardened, go through the steps above. That's how I do it. Hope this helps.
Sabot
Member Since: December 18, 2001
entire network: 12,596 Posts
KitMaker Network: 2,557 Posts
Posted: Tuesday, May 07, 2002 - 08:51 PM UTC
Also try polishing the seam with toothpaste, not gel, but the old Crest or Colgate original formula ones. Toothpaste is basically a mild abrasive and you can buff the plastic with it. I use a piece of cloth, like a handkerchief and rub along the seam. I do this at the sink and "wet sand" the area. Rinse all the toothpaste off when done.
Bravo-Comm
Visit this Community
Texas, United States
Member Since: March 20, 2002
entire network: 525 Posts
KitMaker Network: 0 Posts
Posted: Tuesday, May 07, 2002 - 11:04 PM UTC
i'VE noticed that some of you use alcohol to mix with Acrylic paint. Have any of you tried the Model Master Acrylic Thinner solution. I use it and like the results that I usually get. BUT am I missing something by not using Alcohol?? of course right now I'm working on A/C models and not Armor. BUT my M1-Abrams (Posted here) was painted using the thinner as well as some Enamel paints.And I guess it turned out pretty good. You can judge for yourself.
DAGGER: A weapon with a short pointed Blade: "THE CUTTING EDGE"
YodaMan
Visit this Community
United States
Member Since: February 21, 2002
entire network: 1,561 Posts
KitMaker Network: 485 Posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 08, 2002 - 12:10 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Have any of you tried the Model Master Acrylic Thinner solution? I use it and like the results that I usually get.

It works fine for me. Thankfully, the MM acrylics don't really need a whole lot of thinning to be sprayed. However, since they don't need thinning there's less in the bottle than stuff that does need thinning. (if you think about it for a minute, you'll get it)I prefer airbrushing acrylics to enamels, but that's another thread. (enamels vs. acrylics, I think it was called)

YodaMan
Sabot
Member Since: December 18, 2001
entire network: 12,596 Posts
KitMaker Network: 2,557 Posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 08, 2002 - 12:15 AM UTC

Quoted Text

BUT am I missing something by not using Alcohol??

Cheaper is the only reason. A bottle of alcohol costs less than $1, the thinner is roughly 4 times that amount.
Bravo-Comm
Visit this Community
Texas, United States
Member Since: March 20, 2002
entire network: 525 Posts
KitMaker Network: 0 Posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 08, 2002 - 01:17 AM UTC
Thanks Yoda and SABOT:
I think I tried using Alcohol once and did not have much success. Probably was not half and halfing right. Anyway I then tried using water with Acyrlics, But was not pleased with that either. So I finally found out about the MM thinner and have had pretty good result there. Try spraying from out of the bottle ?? Yes. and some of them just will not work that well with out thinning a little but I am VERY careful about how much I add to it. THE ONE COLOR that gioves me ther most fits.And I try to avoid using it as much as possible, And that is WHITE. There I said it. BUT dont tell it. LOL No but really the color white always gives me the most trouble no matter how I try to apply it. "GO FIGURE" ANYWAY Acril's vs Enamels. I pretty much use to use Enamels ALL the time. BUT my wife complained about the odor and suggested that I try using more AC's She thinks it goes on and looks better. And so after trying it for a while I FINALLY figured out that she was "RIGHT AFTER ALL" ...."OH MAN" LOL
So I still use some enamels but foir the most part I try to use Ac's on the majority of my projects.

DAGGER: A weapon with a short pointed Blade: " THE CUTTING EDGE"
 _GOTOTOP